A blog about a 17 year old girl who doesn't know a lot.

 

cocaine-cutie:

everyone has that “thing” about them that people talk about when you’re not there.

WHAT IS MINE

chesireclam:

arcanacat:

allthingshyper:

smallworldofbigal:

ashleymater:

Tippi Benjamine Okanti Degré, daughter of French wildlife photographers Alain Degré and Sylvie Robert, was born in Namibia. During her childhood she befriended many wild animals, including a 28-year old elephant called Abu and a leopard nicknamed J&B. She was embraced by the Bushmen and the Himba tribespeople of the Kalahari, who taught her how to survive on roots and berries, as well as how to speak their language.

Learn more

in before tumblr screams about cultural appropiation

This doesn’t even count as cultural appropriation

This isn’t a person robbing a culture, to hell with the others

This is a child born right next to that culture

Who was embraced by the people and taught how to do some of the things they do

Which is not the same as cultural appropriation

No cultural appropriation. Just something really beautiful.

I love the picture where she’s cuddling a frog.

eatpussylivehappy:

I think you’re cute

cute as in I wanna hear what you sound like while experiencing an orgasm

voiceofnature:

So I dyed my cats pink with leftover beet water. No regrets! <3 :D I had to wash them because of some oil spill they had gotten into, and chose to use the beet water, which is perfectly safe. I had no idea it would really make them this pink.

voiceofnature:

So I dyed my cats pink with leftover beet water. No regrets! <3 :D
I had to wash them because of some oil spill they had gotten into, and chose to use the beet water, which is perfectly safe. I had no idea it would really make them this pink.

breathofbrine:

parkingintopeter:

do you want to hear a joke

the north american education system

*sobs onto a five paragraph essay that was practically pre-dictated by the teacher and resembles every essay I’ve written for ten years*

what-the-hells-going-on:

ho-ho-holy-shit-its-christmas:

what-the-hells-going-on:

what-the-hells-going-on:

what-the-hells-going-on:

what-the-hells-going-on:

what-the-hells-going-on:

I JUST DROPPED MY STRAIGHTENER IN THE SINK HELP WHAT DO I DO

I PULLED IT OUT BUT NOW ITS MAKING DEMON NOISES

IM AFRAID TO UNPLUG IT WHAT IF IT SHOCKS ME

IM GONNA UNPLUG IT HERE GOES

I UNPLUGGED IT BUT ITS STILL MAKING DEMON SOUNDS

your url makes a disturbing amount of sense right now.

STOP REBLOGGING THIS I ALMOST DIED

what-the-hells-going-on:

ho-ho-holy-shit-its-christmas:

what-the-hells-going-on:

what-the-hells-going-on:

what-the-hells-going-on:

what-the-hells-going-on:

what-the-hells-going-on:

I JUST DROPPED MY STRAIGHTENER IN THE SINK HELP WHAT DO I DO

I PULLED IT OUT BUT NOW ITS MAKING DEMON NOISES

IM AFRAID TO UNPLUG IT WHAT IF IT SHOCKS ME

IM GONNA UNPLUG IT HERE GOES

I UNPLUGGED IT BUT ITS STILL MAKING DEMON SOUNDS

your url makes a disturbing amount of sense right now.

STOP REBLOGGING THIS I ALMOST DIED

shitpostmemeboy:

dogmemes:

hoodbypussy:

Évolution inversée

he looked old for 14

“It took me four years to paint like Raphael, but a lifetime to paint like a child.”
― Pablo Picasso

A white girl wore a bindi at Coachella. And, then my social media feeds went berserk. Hashtagging the term “cultural appropriation” follows the outrage and seems to justify it at the same time. Except that it doesn’t.

Cultural appropriation is the adoption of a specific part of one culture by another cultural group. As I (an Indian) sit here, eating my sushi dinner (Japanese) and drinking tea (Chinese), wearing denim jeans (American), and overhearing Brahm’s Lullaby (German) from the baby’s room, I can’t help but think what’s the big deal?

The big deal with cultural appropriation is when the new adoption is void of the significance that it was supposed to have — it strips the religious, historical and cultural context of something and makes it mass-marketable. That’s pretty offensive. The truth is, I wouldn’t be on this side of the debate if we were talking about Native American headdresses, or tattoos of Polynesian tribal iconography, Chinese characters or Celtic bands.

Why shouldn’t the bindi warrant the same kind of response as the other cultural symbols I’ve listed, you ask? Because most South Asians won’t be able to tell you the religious significance of a bindi. Of my informal survey of 50 Hindu women, not one could accurately explain it’s history, religious or spiritual significance. I had to Google it myself, and I’ve been wearing one since before I could walk.

We can’t accuse non-Hindus of turning the bindi into a fashion accessory with little religious meaning because, well, we’ve already done that. We did it long before Vanessa Hudgens in Coachella 2014, long before Selena Gomez at the MTV Awards in 2013, and even before Gwen Stefani in the mid-90s.

Indian statesman Rajan Zed justifies the opposing view as he explains, “[The bindi] is an auspicious religious and spiritual symbol… It is not meant to be thrown around loosely for seductive effects or as a fashion accessory…” If us Indians had preserved the sanctity and holiness of the bindi, Zed’s argument for cultural appropriation would have been airtight. But, the reality is, we haven’t.

The 5,000 year old tradition of adorning my forehead with kumkum just doesn’t seem to align with the current bindi collection in my dresser — the 10-pack, crystal-encrusted, multi-colored stick-on bindis that have been designed to perfectly compliment my outfit. I didn’t happen to pick up these modern-day bindis at a hyper-hipster spot near my new home in California. No. This lot was brought from the motherland itself.

And, that’s just it. Culture evolves. Indians appreciated the beauty of a bindi and brought it into the world of fashion several decades ago. The single red dot that once was, transformed into a multitude of colors and shapes embellished with all the glitz and glamor that is inherent in Bollywood. I don’t recall an uproar when Indian actress Madhuri Dixit’s bindi was no longer a traditional one. Hindus accepted the evolution of this cultural symbol then. And, as the bindi makes it’s way to the foreheads of non-South Asians, we should accept — even celebrate — the continued evolution of this cultural symbol. Not only has it managed to transcend religion and class in a sea of one-billion brown faces, it will now adorn the faces of many more races. And that’s nothing short of amazing.

So, you won’t find this Hindu posting a flaming tweet accusing a white girl of #culturalappropriation. I will say that I’m glad you find this aspect of my culture beautiful. I do too.

Why a Bindi Is NOT an Example of Culture Appropriation 

by Anjali Joshi

(via breannekiele)

paelfire:

megablaziken:

junkculture:

A World Globe Made Out of Thousands of Individually Painted Matchsticks

part of me appreciates the art and part of me wants to set it on fire

Some people just want to watch the world burn…

awomanfromitaly:

claydols:

its weird that guys get so touchy when you accuse them of sexism like “im not sexist wtf????” when they should really be worried about “ive been acting sexist wtf????” like dude youre not the victim of an accusation the accusation is the result of your behavior

literally every person born into a position to oppress has behaved like this and its gross

(Source: rosewad)